Saturday, November 26, 2016

12 Topic Ideas for Your Employee Newsletter (So You Avoid the Sweat of Article Ideas)

Request 30 employee newsletter articles you can use in your company or employee newsletter

There are 12 topics to consider in your employee newsletter. If you keep these handy you can google these 12 key words and find content ideas for your newsletter. These topics include:

#1: Workplace Relationships

#2: Worker Productivity

#3: Family, Home, and Community

#4: Personal Fitness

#5: Personal Effectiveness & Goal Attainment

#6: Team Building and Productivity

#7: Mental & Physical Health Education

#8: Hot Health Topics

#9: Stress Management Tips

#10: EAP Education for Employees

#11: Workplace Safety and Injury Prevention

#12: Customer Service Issues for Employees


If you are like most employees assigned to do the newsletter, you start out with a staring at a blank page. You want to avoid doing this because you are a like a deer staring into the headlights of an oncoming automobile, and your newsletter will run you over. So, best to have these categories above. Can you determine how each of them is unique. Visit this blog over the coming weeks. I am going to expand on each one, and subdivide them further into about 10 concepts each. You will then have 10 x 120 ideas, and from there we can nuance farther. Thanks for visiting. Feel free to print this brochure to learn more about what we do.

Thursday, June 30, 2016

Generating Story Ideas from YouTube

YouTube -- there is no topic unaddressed in YouTube. Billions of videos hit everything under the sun, and you can use this resource to get article ideas. Here's how. Let's suppose that your company has a problem with drugs and alcohol on the job and you want to write an article on reasonable suspicion training. You simply go to YouTube and what a video like the one below.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=20gT7stk5as

with too many people throwing away recyclables. (I just made this problem instantly off the top of my head.) And let's suppose you want to write an article about it. Here is what you do.
As you watch this video, think "what, why, where, who, when, how" and what is missing, what is different, and you will spot an article idea in your mind. It will pop up. This is how stop writer's block.

Monday, October 5, 2015

Don't Use a Quarterly Newsletter in Your Company

Don't do it. I know, you think employees have too much to read. But you reject quarterly newsletters for workplace wellness tips and the like. Quarterly newsletters are an apology. They are tantamount to your sheepishly slipping your newsletter into employees' IN boxes. The "employees already have too much to read" is completely BS. It's an excuse for you're not publishing more often because you can't handle the workload. Well, there are answers to this problem that make publishing a newsletter brain-dead simple. Click here to get a free trial to Frontline Employee newsletter. The better way to go is a two-page newsletter send each month. Two page newsletters get read -- completely. Four page newsletters get unfinished, put down, and never returned to. Also, many have copy that is too long. Never write more than 230 words in an article, it will not be finished. Things move to fast in the workplace and people's minds. Also, one more thing you should know. A monthly 2-page newsletter is 50% more to read per year than a quarterly 4-pager, but guess what...the two pager newsletter will be completely read.

Saturday, August 23, 2014

Newsletter Articles Your Employees Need: Example



How to Be an “Outside the Box” Problem Solver
A solution to a seemingly impossible problem at work may appear by thinking “outside the box.” This is a learned skill anyone can master, not a mysterious attribute of brilliant minds and cutting-edge companies. To be an outside-the-box problem solver, master these three principles. Principle #1: Free the Brain. This means stop thinking about the problem and get some breathing room by participating in a completely unrelated activity—fishing, jogging, showering, or walking on the beach. This detachment frees your brain from the stress being created to find a solution. Principle #2: Eliminate Roadblocks. You won’t find solutions with inhibitions, your ego, close-mindedness, fears, and negativity getting in your way. Let loose, and give yourself permission to “get sloppy” and “get messy”—allow discovery to take place without restrictions and prohibitions. Principle #3: Be a “Resource and Inputs” Hound. Reading books, studying solutions to similar problems, thinking backward, drawing the problem on paper, and brainstorming with others—all these tactics supply you with informational “inputs” that can speed the way to your solution.

Tuesday, January 7, 2014

Finding Great Article Ideas with ArticleBase.com

There are a lot of article directories. At one point, as many as 200 existed. These article directories solicit content and fight for rankings to sell advertising. The more content, the more traffic. The more traffic the more opportunity to sell ads. Well, two of my favorite are EzineArticles and ArticleBase.com. When I want to write about a specific topic, I visit these websites, and I search for the topic ideas. Sometimes, I do not know what I want to write about. In these instances, I may simply type one letter, say the letter "L". All articles that begin with "L" will appear. There will be hundreds, and more likely thousands. I then start scrolling the pages in search of ideas. Not content. For newsletters, I write original content, but you would be surprised at how many ideas can pop into your head by reading articles with two questions in mind: 1) What is the missing piece of these story, and 2) what other idea is popping into my head as I read this article. Try it and see. Start with the article I wrote at ArticleBase.com. The article is entitled "TWELVE EMPLOYEE NEWSLETTER ARTICLE IDEAS". You will get a ton of information. To make your job even easier, click on the FrontLine Employee link found on this page. Employee newsletters just got easier with this cool tip.

Thursday, January 2, 2014

Remind Employees about the EAP With Your Employee Newsletter

Click Here and We Will Email You Thirty Free Articles

Create articles for your employee newsletter that remind employees about their employee assistance program( EAP), if your company has one. Periodically, I author an article on confidentiality, how laws the govern alcohol and drug records are more strict that the laws governing medical records in doctors' offices, how confidentiality is the cornerstone of EAP success, and other content to convince employees EAPs are the "go-to" place for help with personal problems. You company may have been forced or accidentally made a mistake to use an 800# help line sold to it by the insurance company. If this is the case, remind employee about what an EAP is and also encourage supervisors (not a newsletter, but perhaps in their own publication (see FrontLine Supervisor) to use the EAP as a management tool to address performance and conduct issues with troubled employees. The loss prevention that comes from encouraging employees to seek help from the EAP is incalculable. The one employee in you company who would go "postal" may have a chance to get help if you encourage his self-referral for that anger management problem, conflict with the supervisor, or bullying situation.

Friday, December 27, 2013

Articles for Parents in Employee Newsletters: They'll Read IT

Don't forget parent tips for employee newsletters. Offering parenting tips on teenager behavior will keep your staff interested. Just don't put company news in an employee or company newsletter. (But also ignore the recipes and crossword puzzles). For Example:

Parenting Communication Tip: Making changes in your communication style or speaking habits, if necessary, can be tough, but will improve your teenager’s ability to listen. Not effective and likely to reap negative returns: Preaching, sarcasm in correcting behavior, ridicule, put-downs, yelling and screaming, comparing the teen’s behavior with more successful peers, and not being able to admit when you are wrong or say you are sorry.

Wednesday, September 11, 2013

Frequency Beats Quantity with Workplace Wellness Newsletters

Quarterly wellness newsletters for employees that come to your company. Hmmm. Personally, I like to use them on my kitchen floor beneath the dog's food and water bowls. They do a good job at protecting the wood.

That's the good news about these newsletters, and if you are a serious mental health provider or employee assistance program trying to help employees, I would suggest that you find a new use for these publications, or get a dog.

Quarterly newsletters are given to your company for one reason alone: More frequently would be too expensive. These publications are not frequent enough to make an impact and there is too much material at one time for employees to read before they are distracted and put it down forever.

So at two levels, they make no impact -- content and frequency. The truth is that these 4-pagers that come "free" tied in string, are written by freelance copywriters who--until they tackled the article on the five best vegetables with potassium after reading Wikipedia--had no occupational health or employee assistance knowledge whatsoever, unless of course they have an alcoholic in their family. In this case, like most family members of alcoholics--they are are impermeable experts.

Here's what you need to do to make an impact with your company newsletter or wellness newsletter for employees. First you need to consider an employee wellness newsletter that has monthly frequency. Don't give me the old song and dance that employees have too much to read already and that monthly is too much. I'm talking about two pages with an average of 130 words per article. Second, this two-page (any less frequency and you will lose impact and top of mind positioning for whatever program you are trying to promote) newsletter must delve deeper into topics employees don't see on television: Try looking for a company or employee newsletter with articles and titles--newsletter topics that leave employees with "more" to grow with. Titles like:
  • Improve Your Emotional Intelligence;
  • Multitasking Versus "Chunking" (Time Management)
  • Don’t Let Mental Health Get Flabby
  • Medication Memory Minder App Available
  • Subtle Clues to Suicidal Risk
  • Myths about Tolerance in the Workplace
  • Date Rape Drugs Still a Hazard
  • The Performance Conversation
These articles are not the kind that managed care companies print. The truth is that managed care companies are not not trying to make an impact. They are trying fill the contract requirements.

Employees will read, pass around, and take home a corporate wellness newsletter with articles like you see above, and family members will benefit. This is the impact you are looking for so your company's bottom line benefits along with the employee behavior change or improvement. You have a captured audience in your workforce. Feed them the good stuff. Get a newsletter that delivers wellness and productivity. Try a free trial of FrontLine Employee Workplace Wellness Newsletter .

Monday, September 2, 2013

Approach Tough Topics with Your Employee Wellness Newsletter

Stop being all "nice" on topics of grave concern to employees. Regarding articles for employee newsletters, you must see good content but also impactful content. And this employee newsletter topic is a key example:  It's time to remind college students, especially girls, to be aware of date rape drugs and predator-like substances. They will listen to the employee newsletter before they listen to you!



In July 2013, 32 Styrofoam cups with residue of the date rape drug GHB were found in Racine, Wisconsinabout two miles from the University of Wisconsin. In June, a man was arrested in Williamsville, New York, after giving GHB to a college intern. In July, Canadian police in Alberta found 10,000 doses of GHB in a raid. Think twice before heading off to “raves” or wild dance parties, particularly at college. These events are ground zero for the use of predator or date rape drugs such as Rohypnol, Ketamine, and GHB. If you suddenly feel inexplicably ill or dizzy at a party, call for emergency help. Don’t take a drink from another person, lose track of your drink, or allow someone to go get you a drink. When in doubt, dump it. Learn more at http://womenshealth.gov. In the search bar, type “date rape drugs.” This is what I call a good newsletter topic. Read more examples here in a complete kit on employee newsletters.

Thursday, August 8, 2013

How to Do Know if Newsletter Content is Accurate

If you are purchasing newsletter content or an employee newsletter, don't be fooled by newsletters service providers who appear to have a medical director on their publishing team who approves content. As you and I both know, some doctors are not that knowledge about many topics. Alcoholism and substance abuse are just one example. The issue is experience with a broad range of personal problems. No medical doctor on the publishing board of a wellness newsletter is an expert on connecting families with home health care, intervening with suicidal persons, delivering postraumatic stress disorder intervention help, and the like. Who has the most experience in the broadest area of human and employee workplace problems? The answer is a licensed mental health professional with extensive employee assistance programming experience. That is what this workplace wellness newsletter is all about.

Sunday, August 4, 2013

Next Staff Meeting: Generate Employee Wellness Newsletter Content Ideas

The next time you have a staff meeting, sent a kitchen timer for three minutes and brainstorm ideas for stories for your company wellness newsletter. If that works, you will come up with dozens of ideas based upon this discussion and these newsletter article ideas will be directly relevant to the concerns of employees in your workplace. Better yet funnel them to WorkplaceNewsletters.com and get a subscription for a newsletter you can cal your own.

Monday, February 11, 2013

Totally Free Human Resources Materials for Training and Wellness

I discovered a great page for signing up for human resources materials that include a lot of workplace wellness, respect, conflict, dealing with difficult people, resiliency issues, holiday stress. Sign up here and don't say I didn't find you a gold mine. Free HR Resources and HR Resources Free  ....

Monday, December 17, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 43: Space and Time

Take a set break from your work, and don't think about it at all.  Keep your focus on other things, such as cleaning or maintenance tasks that need to be accomplished.  This may feel like procrastination, but if you have been staring at the blank screen feeling blocked, you aren't getting anything done anyway.  When you return from your break, your mind should be refreshed and ready to start writing again.  If not, give it some more time; it may turn out you work better on a tighter deadline anyway. Would like your own newsletter completely done for you each month? Seriously. And for one low price? Think up a title, give us your logo, send us to your website. If you have over 100 employees, we will create a unique and professional nameplate-masthead look just for you FOR FREE. - http://eaptools.com/images/nameplates.jpg

Monday, December 10, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 42: Spread Thin

Distill your topic down to its most basic form, to the point that you can describe it in one or two words.  Then explode the idea outwards from there—perhaps using the webbing technique (bubbles with connecting lines).  Don't neglect to put down any possible aspect, from technical definitions to poetic descriptions to the ways it will impact future generations.  Exhaust all of the possible ways you could talk about your topic until you find something that strikes your muse's fancy. Save money. One low annual subscription to FrontLine Employee serves your entire organization--every employee--for a full year with 12 issues.  Copy, email, or post newsletters on a protected page of your website. Try it out at http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, December 3, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 41: Sounds Scripted

Write your entire piece in nothing but dialogue.  You can use dialogue tags if you need to make it clear who is speaking, but otherwise, leave out everything not between quotation marks.  If you're stuck looking for an opening line, choose a famous one from a movie or television and go from there.  You can write it as a product demonstration, two friends conversing about an event, or an epic movie scene. No more embarrassing grammar mistakes--each  issue is professionally proofread. Will the never make a mistake. Hard to tell. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, November 26, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 40: Get Your Blood Moving


Exercise releases endorphins, making you feel happier and more energetic.  Make it a habit to exercise before you start writing, and you will come to associate it with a good feeling.  Go for a run in the morning before you start your daily writing regimen, or set up your yoga mat near your workspace and clear your mind and loosen up your body.  If you can, write after every time you exercise, including pick-up games and walking the dog, and your mind will soon develop a connection between the endorphin high and the act of putting words to paper. We can help you publish a newsletter of your very own for a flat rate and do so each month. And we will accept for consideration your ideas. Send them to us. About 95% of subscriber article requests are used -- respect issues, conflicts, communication, etc. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, November 19, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 39: Monotony

Find yourself a mind-numbingly dull task—vacuuming, showering, filing paperwork—and engage in it with the intent of letting your mind wander.  Get lost in the repetitive movements or quiet environment of the task, and don't focus too hard on your writing or writer's block.  As you work, your brain will gently tease the words free and you may even be struck by "eureka!" inspiration (but not the vacuum brand kind).  Many people do their best thinking in the shower, when their bodies are occupied and their minds are free to roam without restraints. Do you need a newsletter that is just the right size and amount of content with the ability to edit, add, subtract, reshuffle content, or use the newsletter without making any changes at all? Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, November 12, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 38: The What-If Game



Brainstorm a list of ten what-if questions, and then brainstorm an answer or two for each one.  Make these as preposterous as you can muster, especially if they are related to the piece you're blocked on.  This is the ultimate outside-the-box exercise, and although you may feel very silly writing about flying staplers or the reanimated lunch food, the child's play will free your subconscious to let everything come more easily.  You can play a more serious version of the what-if game in meetings to stimulate brainstorming in a group. End  writer's block and mad searches for article ideas and content on the Internet. Eliminate the deadline pressure. Here's how. Start with a trial to FrontLine Employee. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, November 5, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 37: Size Doesn't Matter

Write a 100-word sentence.  It must be properly punctuated, but it can ramble and meander as much as you'd like.  When you go back and read it, you may find buried in there an idea you wouldn't have realized was present if you hadn't let your words flow.  If you continue the sentence past 100 words, don't stop yourself. Would not it be nice to have no more frustration, embarrassment, or worrying about getting your newsletter out on time. (I once struggled with this myself.) Your monthly issue comes early--a week early--before the month of issue! To learn more go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html 

Monday, October 29, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 36: Cliché Clash

Choose two clichés, such as "don't look a gift horse in the mouth" and "a rolling stone catches no moss," and put them together.  (There are online cliché generators if you can't think of two good ones.)  Use that as your starting point, as if you were proving some old folk saying true—"a rolling stone catches no horse in the mouth."  Having to defend an abstract statement pushes you outside of the box of normal writing and makes you think creatively. Gain more free time for other tasks or for yourself. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, October 22, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 35: Different Mediums

If you usually type, pick up a pen and write by hand.  You may end up with writer's cramp, but push past the pain and you'll find it's a very intimate way to write.  If you usually write by hand, try typing into a plain text document.  Don't let your fingers get ahead of your subconscious—find a pace that works for both your typing speed and your mind.  Changing the medium you're working in may stimulate a different part of your brain and release the writer's block.Imagine this---getting original employee-focused, workplace wellness AND productivity content for your newsletter written by licensed mental health professionals with extensive workplace experience with articles that address communication, solving employee problems, reducing conflicts, substance abuse, absenteeism, violence, crises, dealing with difficult people, stress management, elder care issues, improving the relationship with your supervisor, family problems, achieve goals at work, improving morale, getting to work on time, and hundreds more. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, October 15, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 34: Alphabet Soup

Write a word pertaining to your topic at the top of a piece of paper—either the general name of the topic, or a subtopic you plan to concentrate on.  Underneath that, create a list of related words, but to keep yourself focused, you must have at least one for every letter of the alphabet.  If you get stuck, make up words until you can get back on track.  To keep track of the letters you've done (unless you plan to just write them alphabetically), make the pertinent letters block and bold. Do you have an employee newsletter for health and workplace wellness? Remember----in the past you had a newsletter but no one could keep up with it? Almost every subscriber to FrontLine Employee has had this experience. It is the #1 reason motivating our new subscribers. We're the cure. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, October 8, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 33: Questionnaire


Write your piece as a series of questions that a reader might ask you, and leave spaces in between for you to fill in the blanks afterwards.  When you put down the answers, be as thorough and honest as you can, as if you were answering the questionnaire for a family member or friend.  Then use the material you generate to write the actual work.  Polish the language and tighten the grammar, but keep the honesty and conversational tone! Would like to have your own newsletter for your company or workplace? Well, finally you get a newsletter--easily. And it's your own. Watch your internal communication improve overnight. Also, get your life back! No more lost weekends, deadline pressures, or doing the newsletter "after hours".  It's complete upon arrival, but editable. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, October 1, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 32: Shift Your Focus

Instead of fretting over the piece you are blocked on, set it aside and work on something you're more looking forward to writing. Take this time to work on a personal project or a more light-hearted piece that doesn't require as much concentration as it does creativity. The act of putting words on the paper for a project that brings you joy can make writing easy again when you finally return to your original work. Would like your own newsletter completely done for you each month? Seriously. And for one low price? Think up a title, give us your logo, send us to your website. If you have over 100 employees, we will create a unique and professional nameplate-masthead look just for you FOR FREE. - http://eaptools.com/images/nameplates.jpg

Monday, September 24, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 31: Bubbly

Write ideas you are trying to connect on a page, in random locations, and draw circles around them.  Then draw lines of small circles connecting them, and fill these with phrases that can logically transition you from one idea to another.  Don't plan what you'll fill the bubbles with, because half the discovery is finding out in the moment what your brain will come up with on the fly.  The idea of the bubbles is to go with your first instinct, not concentrate on finding the perfect answer—sometimes the perfect answers are very unexpected! Save money. One low annual subscription to FrontLine Employee serves your entire organization--every employee--for a full year with 12 issues.  Copy, email, or post newsletters on a protected page of your website. Try it out at http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, September 17, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip # 30: Musical Influences

Load your music and turn on the shuffle or random function, making sure you're the only one who will have to listen to the song.  Write for the duration of the first (appropriate) song that queues up—no longer, no shorter.  Be sure to focus on the mood or story of the song as you write, allowing it to guide your piece and direct it somewhere you may not have thought of on your own.  You can also use music specifically to guide a writing session, if you know how a certain song helps you work. No more embarrassing grammar mistakes--each  issue is professionally proofread. Will the never make a mistake. Hard to tell. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, September 10, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #29: Alphabetical

Start your first sentence with a word beginning with the letter A and proceed until you've covered the alphabet.  You'll probably not end up with a perfect piece, but it will give you raw material to work with.  Realize that some sentences will be awkward because of the word you have to choose in order to stay in alphabetical form, but occasionally you'll find a new way to phrase something because you have to work around some unusual syntax. We can help you publish a newsletter of your very own for a flat rate and do so each month. And we will accept for consideration your ideas. Send them to us. About 95% of subscriber article requests are used -- respect issues, conflicts, communication, etc. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, September 3, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #28: Include These Words

Write three basic paragraphs related to the work you're blocked on.  The paragraphs must, somewhere, include the following five words: plaster, rumors, yellow, defense, and insect.  You can recycle this exercise as many times as you would like, because the words can always be arranged differently.  If, however, you're tired of that set, here are two more: dirt, placement, renegade, brown, and striped; template, bag, victory, zealous, and string.Do you need a newsletter that is just the right size and amount of content with the ability to edit, add, subtract, reshuffle content, or use the newsletter without making any changes at all? Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, August 27, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #27: Genre Jump


Familiarize yourself with the styles found in different genres of writing—journalism, poetry, technical, fiction (and its sub-genres), etc.  When you find yourself hit by writer's block, adopt a different style than the one you originally intended to use and see if the new voice helps free your words.  Even if you can't actually use the tone of a science fiction author in your final draft, it may be a familiar sound and flow more easily when you're initially writing.End  writer's block and mad searches for article ideas and content on the Internet. Eliminate the deadline pressure. Here's how. Start with a trial to FrontLine Employee. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, August 20, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #26: Quotation Marks

Start each day's writing with a quote, famous or otherwise, related to the theme of your piece.  Use it to focus your writing by making it the thesis statement of what you're writing.  If you prefer, you can defend or disagree with the point that it makes in a persuasive piece.  Some of the sentences you generate may be useful later to bolster up the finished product.Would not it be nice to have no more frustration, embarrassment, or worrying about getting your newsletter out on time. (I once struggled with this myself.) Your monthly issue comes early--a week early--before the month of issue! To learn more go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, August 13, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #25: Photographic Lens

If you can find a photograph that can accompany your story or piece, focus on that for a while.  Sit and absorb the imagery of the photograph without rushing over it or assuming you know what is going on.  Write about what you see in the picture—what's happening and what it looks like.  Pay special attention to the subtleties—the way someone's hand is angled towards another's leg, the way the dog is cowering just slightly, the way everyone is actually eyeing the food.Gain more free time for other tasks or for yourself. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, August 6, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #24: Opening Lines

Sometimes, the hardest thing to do is fill a blank page or screen with an opening line.  Instead of limiting yourself to just one, quickly jot down ten ways you could start the piece, each completely different from the rest.  By the time you're finished, you may have found the perfect way to begin.  Start with your favorite, and if it doesn't work, switch to another one and start anew. Imagine this---getting original employee-focused, workplace wellness AND productivity content for your newsletter written by licensed mental health professionals with extensive workplace experience with articles that address communication, solving employee problems, reducing conflicts, substance abuse, absenteeism, violence, crises, dealing with difficult people, stress management, elder care issues, improving the relationship with your supervisor, family problems, achieve goals at work, improving morale, getting to work on time, and hundreds more. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, July 30, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #23: Syllables

If you're struggling to find the right words for what you want to say, stop stressing about the exact wording; set your internal editor aside.  Instead, write using only one-syllable words.  Listen to the new rhythm it gives the story or article, which will become much easier to write as you let your unconscious guide you into the pattern.  Continue to write with one-syllable words until you are finding the words again, even if that means letting some multiple-syllable words slip in there. Do you have an employee newsletter for health and workplace wellness? Remember----in the past you had a newsletter but no one could keep up with it? Almost every subscriber to FrontLine Employee has had this experience. It is the #1 reason motivating our new subscribers. We're the cure. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, July 23, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #22: Fleshing it Out(line)

Start with the most basic outline possible—a single word for each paragraph or point you're going to make.  Then go back and add two words to each item, giving them a little more weight.  Gradually increase these increments of words until you have a fully-fledged outline and know exactly where your piece is headed.  Continue to build on that outline, and eventually you will have the work itself! Would like to have your own newsletter for your company or workplace? Well, finally you get a newsletter--easily. And it's your own. Watch your internal communication improve overnight. Also, get your life back! No more lost weekends, deadline pressures, or doing the newsletter "after hours".  It's complete upon arrival, but editable. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, July 16, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #21: Visual Timeline

Some writers use index cards or sticky notes to create a timeline for their writing, but to keep your creativity high, make your timeline out of magazine photographs instead.  Hang it somewhere you can see it while you write.  As you make changes, alter the pictures to reflect the new direction your piece is going.  If you need to keep notes as well, use small sticky notes that will easily come away from the pictures when their purpose is served. Would like your own newsletter completely done for you each month? Seriously. And for one low price? Think up a title, give us your logo, send us to your website. If you have over 100 employees, we will create a unique and professional nameplate-masthead look just for you FOR FREE. - http://eaptools.com/images/nameplates.jpg

Monday, July 9, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #20: Rocky Relief

Purchase a worry-stone (a flat stone with a depression in the center where you can rub your thumb) and hold it while you write or type with your other hand.  Focus on the way the stone feels instead of the words, and let your subconscious do the work.  Other worry-objects are useful for this as well, such as beads on a necklace or spinning rings.  Make sure whatever you choose is small and portable in case your writing takes you away from your desk.Save money. One low annual subscription to FrontLine Employee serves your entire organization--every employee--for a full year with 12 issues.  Copy, email, or post newsletters on a protected page of your website. Try it out at http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, July 2, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #19: True Freewriting


Sometimes, writer's block is the result of mental clutter, and you just have to clear it.  Set yourself a 10-minute timer and write whatever comes to mind without stopping until the time runs out. Freewriting by hand is often more productive, as the physical motion coincides with the release of word blockades, but if you feel that typing will give you a faster flow, you can do that as well. No more embarrassing grammar mistakes--each  issue is professionally proofread. Will the never make a mistake. Hard to tell. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, June 25, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #18: Get Into Character





If you're having trouble finding your voice for a piece, borrow someone else's. Put yourself into the shoes of a reporter, a wallflower, a spy, or even a passer-by and write the way they would see the idea, scene, or story. You may not be able to use this character's voice later, but you will see the material from a new perspective. It may help to imagine the piece being read out loud by the voice of a television or movie character. We can help you publish a newsletter of your very own for a flat rate and do so each month. And we will accept for consideration your ideas. Send them to us. About 95% of subscriber article requests are used -- respect issues, conflicts, communication, etc. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html


Monday, June 18, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #17: Regular Rewards

Set tiny word goals on your project, and every time you reach one, reward yourself—with a single piece of candy, perhaps, or with one game of solitaire.  Don't get distracted and indulge in more than one reward, or the system will collapse.  If you stick to it rigidly, eventually you will have plugged along right through your entire piece!  Find a reward that works for you, even if that means experimenting over a few days.Do you need a newsletter that is just the right size and amount of content with the ability to edit, add, subtract, reshuffle content, or use the newsletter without making any changes at all? Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, June 11, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #16: An Ideal Space


Surround yourself with trinkets and images that inspire your creativity.  Make sure your writing workspace is as accommodating to your muse as possible, even if that means getting a little silly with the decorations.  Do you write by hand?  Leave your favorite kind of pen and notebooks out where they are easily accessible, in case you're struck by a great idea while you're otherwise occupied. End  writer's block and mad searches for article ideas and content on the Internet. Eliminate the deadline pressure. Here's how. Start with a trial to FrontLine Employee. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, June 4, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #15: Scheduled Creativity


Set yourself a regular time to sit down and write, even if you are just typing the same word over and over, and stick to it.  Eventually, your brain will become used to the routine and the words will be more readily at your fingertips.  Many people prefer the early morning, when they are first awake and their brains are fresh from sleep, while others prefer the nighttime, when they can dump out the data from the day onto the page.Would not it be nice to have no more frustration, embarrassment, or worrying about getting your newsletter out on time. (I once struggled with this myself.) Your monthly issue comes early--a week early--before the month of issue! To learn more go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, May 28, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #14: Strictly Speaking


Find a quiet place where you won't be disturbed and bring a recording device with you (anything handheld will do).  Narrate out loud the piece you're stuck on, as if to a friend—you may find that using your actual voice will help you find your writing voice again.  If your piece has multiple character voices, don't read them all in the same monotone—improvise and add color.  When you listen to it later, you can edit for clarity, but maintain your voice as much as possible. Gain more free time for other tasks or for yourself. http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Monday, May 21, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #13: Commercial Ending


Watch an advertisement on TV and pay close attention to the ending.  Write what would happen next if you were in charge of the campaign, and use the ideas you generate as starting points for what you were stuck on.  If you're feeling really ambitious, combine two commercials and start at the place where they would collide.  You can use this as a way to brainstorm advertising campaigns of your own, or just as a way to get your muse moving. Imagine this---getting original employee-focused, workplace wellness AND productivity content for your newsletter written by licensed mental health professionals with extensive workplace experience with articles that address communication, solving employee problems, reducing conflicts, substance abuse, absenteeism, violence, crises, dealing with difficult people, stress management, elder care issues, improving the relationship with your supervisor, family problems, achieve goals at work, improving morale, getting to work on time, and hundreds more. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html



Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #12: Character Sketches

Concentrate on the characters in your writing—real people or otherwise—and come up with short profiles or biographies.  Use these to inform future work that includes them.  Don't skimp on the details—go into clothing choices (and the reasons behind those picks), favorite music and meals, hometown, even the place they leave their dirty laundry.  A lot can be known about a person by the little details of his or her life.Do you have an employee newsletter for health and workplace wellness? Remember----in the past you had a newsletter but no one could keep up with it? Almost every subscriber to FrontLine Employee has had this experience. It is the #1 reason motivating our new subscribers. We're the cure. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Tuesday, May 8, 2012

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #11: Backwards Progress

Start your day's writing with the last sentence of what you want to have written; this will give you a clear destination as you inch towards your goal.  If you get stuck, write the second-to-last sentence, and so on, until you meet in the middle.  You may want to write your entire piece backwards, if you find out this flows more easily for you.  However, you'll want to go back and revise afterwards, because the language will sound very different when read forward than when you wrote it backwards. Would like to have your own newsletter for your company or workplace? Well, finally you get a newsletter--easily. And it's your own. Watch your internal communication improve overnight. Also, get your life back! No more lost weekends, deadline pressures, or doing the newsletter "after hours".  It's complete upon arrival, but editable. Go to http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html





Wednesday, December 7, 2011

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #10: Poetic Presentation

Find a poem (there are lots online if you aren't near a book) and choose a line at random. You can use a number generator if you don't trust yourself to randomly choose a line. Put that line at the top of your page and imagine it is the theme or title of a presentation you are handling at work. Now, write the speech you would give if that were the title you planned to announce to your audience. Did you know your company newsletter is a powerful tool to change behaviors that will positively influence the bottom line of your organization? That is because your employees are a captured audience (in a positive way). They will read almost anything you put in front of them that does not have anything to do with work. Your newsletter can influence better parenting, coming to work on time, reducing waste, and decreasing conflicts. It all depends on what you put in the newsletter. Here, try this for example. It's a free trial to an editable newsletter called FrontLine Employee: http://workexcel.net/FE/fe-trial-request.html

Saturday, July 9, 2011

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #9: 9. Animated Conversations

To really loosen up your muse, choose an inanimate object (or animal) and start writing a conversation with it. Focus on the voice your conversational partner has—the way it says certain words or just its view of the world. Even if you're working on a technical piece, this exercise can really have some merit by pulling you out of your singular perspective and studying your subject from another angle, as you and an inanimate object discuss it conversationally.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Writer's Block Obliteration Tip #8

Choose the name of a color and write a description of something with that hue, without ever mentioning the color. This exercise helps you be very mindful of what you're writing and forces you not to rely on clichés. Afterwards, give the piece to a reader and see if they can figure out what you're describing. If so, you're on the right track—but if not, you need to learn to rely better on the way you use descriptive language! Descriptive language is critical in effective content writing, but this exercise enables idea generation as well. I just created this movie about FrontLine Employee. You may like it.