Friday, March 17, 2017

Improve Employee Mental Health with a Company Health Wellness or Employee Newsletter

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A health and wellness newsletter for your company has a few purposes wrapped up into one. These purposes or goals include improving communication within the organization and offering some "glue" that keeps everyone knowledgeable about the most important news and trends of concern to the company.

The other goal is employee health. If you can make an impact on behavior and create more proactive employees, and by way of content improve their health--in any way--it may contribute to less presenteeism. (If you have never heard of this word, it means coming
When people seek help for similar problems the empathy
impact can be quite impressive and moving. Employee
Newsletters for health and wellness can motivate
employees to pursue personal wellness in new ways.

to work sick.) People postpone taking care of themselves. This costs companies money. This should be a target goal of employee newsletter content.

I like slipping articles in company newsletters that reduce mystery and fear about the various channels for getting help.

I once wrote article on Bariatric physicians to educate the workforce on what these specialists do (weight management intervention.)

The other topic I touch on periodically is modalities of counseling. For example, many people know about individual counseling, but few know how group psychotherapy. Group psychotherapy is powerful stuff, and it can be a heck of a lot of fun because the empathy impact of having 6-7 other people seeking help for the same thing can be impressive. Think "mastermind" group and you will know what I am talking about.

So this article below gives you a flavor on this topic of employee newsletters and how it can help employees take the plunge into counseling and consider group therapy for a particular problem. ...

Group Psychotherapy Group therapy employs small-group interaction to help participants address mental health issues and make changes in their lives. Professionally led, group therapy focuses on problems like overcoming life struggles, eliminating self-defeating behaviors, helping overcome life crises such as grief, and preventing the repeat of problems experienced in relationships.

Don’t overlook group psychotherapy as an avenue of help for rapid change. Group therapy members usually bond quickly, and the leverage they create is the collective insight and common past experiences they share. This power is used to supportive and confront each other, insist on honesty, and overcome resistance to change—the change you want and are looking for so desperately.

(Learn about Frontline Employee customize-able, Workplace Wellness Newsletter for Human Resources.)


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